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Health | By Gardy Chacha.
‘Boot’ sex is safe? Think again.
There is general ‘nonchalance’ that has steadily replaced the doom and gloom that HIV evoked in people two decades ago. Today, words like ‘condom’ or ‘penis’ no longer provoke discomfort and more or less sound as innocent as ‘church’ or ‘water.’
The society in the 21st century is freer such that the mindset of yester years has been replaced with more radical thinking especially on the sexual front.
Consider the latest info from the ministry of health suggesting that nearly one fourth of Kenya’s prostitutes believe that ‘sex from behind’ is safer to conventional ‘missionary’ sex. This belief is worrying in view of homosexuality embedding its subculture in Kenya.
Dr George Githuka – who worked with National AIDS and STI Control Programme (NASCOP) at the time we spoke last year said that anal intercourse increases chances of being infected with an STI – HIV in this case. Dr Githuka touched a little on the history of HIV.
“It was early 1980s when doctors noticed a disease that caused wasting before killing its patients. They noted that it was very rife among men who had sex with other men,” Githuka offered. It is only years later that it would be discovered why gay people presented a higher affinity to infection by the virus.
Githuka says: “The anus, compared to the vagina, does not lubricate naturally during intercourse. It is dry. This increases friction and therefore tears and wounds through which the virus gets easily inoculated.”
John Mathenge, who proudly fights for rights of commercial male sex workers, also held the view, at the time, that gay hookers were off the hook no matter the number of clients they were handling since “You have to walk around with lots of lubrication. It reduces friction and therefore chances of infection. ”
But health experts in sexually transmitted diseases have debunked this notion and just because ‘kufunguliwa boot’ does not lead to pregnancy does not mean it makes it safer and commercial sex workers of either gender, are thus at risk of higher infection rate with the HIV/Aids virus.
That strong whiskey could make you a sadist-Report.
Researchers from Innsbruck University in Austria have released results of a survey they conducted on 1000 subjects, showing that bitter taste preferences are linked to malevolent personality traits.
‘The results suggest that how much people like bitter-tasting foods and drinks is stably tied to how dark their personality is,’ they write in their report.
The team, comprising psychologists, determined that people who seem to have a penchant for coffee and tonic water tended to exhibit signs of Machiavellianism, sadism, and narcissism. They were duplicitous and self-serving, cold-hearted and lacking in empathy, vain and selfish, and more likely to derive pleasure from other people’s pain.
Whether there is truth in these findings is subject for further studies. Read More By: Gardy Chacha.
A continuum of risk? The management of health, physical and emotional risks by female sex workers.
First published: 29 July 2004 Full publication history DOI: 10.1111/j.0141-9889.2004.00405.x View/save citation Cited by (CrossRef): 92 articles Check for updates.
Teela Sanders, School of Sociology and Social Policy, University of Leeds, Leeds LS2 9JT e-mail: t.l.m.sanders@leeds.ac.uk.
Abstract This paper describes the findings from a 10-month ethnographic study of the female sex industry in a large British city. I argue that sex workers construct a continuum of risk which prioritises certain types of dangers depending on the perceived consequences and the degree of control individuals consider they have over minimising the likelihood of a risk occurring. Although health-related matters are a real concern to many women, because they generally have comprehensive strategies to manage health risks at work, this risk category is given a low priority compared with other risks. The risk of violence is considered a greater anxiety because of the prevalence of incidents in the sex work community. However, because of comprehensive screening and protection strategies to minimise violence, this type of harm is not given the same level of attention that emotional risks receive. By using a continuum of risk to understand how sex workers perceive occupational hazards in prostitution, further understanding can be gained about the nature of risk in prostitution, sex workers’ routines and the organisational features of the sex industry. In addition, the implications for health policy are discussed, suggesting that the emotional consequences of selling sex should be considered as much as the tangible, physical risks of prostitution.
Introduction: risk and sex work.
Over the past decade this journal has highlighted some important and pioneering research findings about the sex industry in the Western world. Scambler et al. (1990) discuss the impact of HIV and AIDS on how women sell sex, Green et al. (2000) explain the risks associated with crack cocaine use in prostitution, while Rhodes and Cusick’s (2000) exploration of intimacy is of particular relevance for understanding how emotions influence unprotected sex and condom use. This is complemented by Warr and Pyett (1999) who found that sex workers were at risk in their private life because of the meanings attached to condom use in the commercial context. Barnard (1993) draws our attention to the level of violence that sex workers face and Whittaker and Hart (1996) describe the nature of indoor sex markets and the different types of risk that women face indoors compared to those on the street. Plumridge et al. (1997) explore the clients perspective of condom use and describe some masculine discourses through which the sex worker – client relationship can be understood.

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