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She does this so that she can afford the US$250 (S$350) worth of arthritis medicine a month. Her arthritis is so severe that she can barely walk.
When Channel NewsAsia approached her on the street, she said: “You came to play? To meet someone? The room fee is US$10. The fee for the woman is US$30.”
COULDN’T FIND ANY OTHER JOB.
Mdm Park said that she married when she was 19. When she was in her late 20s, her husband gambled away the family home and left her alone to raise four children.
She was working as a kitchen helper and couldn’t afford to send them to school. Today they don’t earn enough to support her, and she claims that they do not care about her. She currently lives with her relatives in a small house and they have barely enough to live by.
Mdm Park said that her knees gave way when she was in her early 70s and she couldn’t find a job. Desperate for food and medication, she became a Bacchus lady.
“Even if I am going to die, I need the medicine. The day after next, I will go to the hospital and get an injection for the bones. It is so painful,” she said.
Prostitution is illegal in South Korea and Mdm Park said that she has been caught and fined several times by the police. However, desperate times calls for desperate measures.
“It is embarrassing. I am embarrassed because I am old,” she said. Aside from the 82-year-old grandmother who is the street’s oldest sex-worker, “I am the next oldest. And next is 60-plus years old. There is no one below 50. All of them have grandchildren,” she said.
ELDERLY POVERTY AND INSUFFICIENT PENSIONS.
South Korea has one of the world’s fastest ageing populations and nearly half of its elderly live in poverty.
Its pension and welfare systems for the elderly lag behind other developed countries; nearly half of South Koreans aged 65 and older live on less than half the national median income.
A soup kitchen in South Korea caters to the elderly poor.
Professor Lee Ho-Sun, from the Korea Soongsil Cyber University in Seoul, who has been studying these ‘Bacchus ladies’ for years, said that most only started selling sex later in life.
She said that between 2013 and 2014, the number of ‘Bacchus ladies’ peaked at about 300 to 400 in the Jongno neighbourhood alone.
“I cannot tell when they (Bacchus ladies) started but most of them were neglected during the currency crisis in 1997. Families could not really support their parents as before. So, the senior citizens became homeless and… since they do not have much skills, all they could do was become a prostitute,” she said.
She described the basic pension in South Korea – about 200,000 won a month – as insufficient.
Some of the elderly are unwilling to burden their children with their financial difficulties. Others were left behind in the countryside while their children moved to the cities to seek employment and education.
Dr Lee said: “Times are changing – in the past, it was enough to get by on one person’s income. Now even a dual income isn’t sufficient. Children are not in the position to take care of their parents. The elderly problem in South Korea is very shameful.
“Unless the young adult’s problems are solved, we cannot solve the elderly’s problems.”
Watch the Get Rea! documentary on South Korea’s elderly poor on Jan 31 at 8pm SG/HK.
South Korean host bars – for women.
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South Korea’s rapid economic development has meant some startling changes within its conservative social structure, including the rise of so-called host bars, where wealthy women pay the equivalent of thousands of dollars for male company.
In the dim light of an underground room, a dozen perfectly groomed young men kneel in rows, calling out their names.
Muscular, with shiny boy-band hairstyles, they cram side by side into the narrow space, waiting for us to make our choice. Outside in the corridor, more of their colleagues are arriving for another night at work. It is 2am, and we are their first customers.
Hidden beneath the pavements of Seoul’s ritziest postcode, Gangnam, the men at Bar 123 are part of a growing industry, which grew out of the long traditions of Japanese geisha and Korea’s kisaeng houses but with one crucial difference – the customers here are all women.
Known as “host bars”, these all-night drinking rooms offer female customers the chance to select and pay for male companions, sometimes at a cost of thousands of pounds a night.
One of the women I meet at Bar 123 is Minkyoung, a waitressing manager for a five-star hotel. She says she comes to host bars once or twice a month.
Minkyoung is very pretty and her clothes are immaculate. She does not look like someone who would need to pay for male company. But the allure of host bars can be subtle. Here, she says, she has more attention from her male companions, more choice and, crucially, more control.
“In regular bars the guys who drink with me have only one goal – to have a one-night stand. But I don’t want that, so that’s why I come here, I want to have fun,” she says.

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